Category Archives: Warlockery

Leveling Data on Warlocks is Worse than I Thought

This is the second post in The Decline and Fall of Warlocks in Cataclysm series.

This is an addendum to Where Did All The Warlocks Go in Cataclysm?. It’s not the followup I promised, that is still in progress.

In that post, I wrote:

Unlike most classes, Warlocks decline as they level. There’s a slight decline from 80-84 to 85, which might represent people leveling to endgame and then dropping the character, but it’s not huge. They decline a bit (3%) through the leveling process, but that’s nothing like what happens to Rogues (5%). I think you have a stronger case for saying people have started a lot of Rogues but not gotten them to endgame than you do with Warlocks – 3% could be just noise in the system from the DK bump, plus, there’s the Rogue Legendary Carrot – but there is still something going on there.

I would like to retract those statements about Warlocks, and the conclusions that follow from it.

I was wrong and underestimated how bad things looked for warlocks through the leveling process. They decline 20% in popularity from levels 20 to 85, and are substantially underrepresented at all levels. Few players are rolling them, fewer take them to endgame, and even fewer still play them at endgame.

Jason left a great comment on the post. In it, he said:

Your chart showing the trend of toon popularity would look better if you indexed them to the average (for pre-DK the avg is 11.11, and 10 after). This really drives home the trends.

For hunters that would make their trend: 159,151,143,134,109,120,131,120,109.

For Warlocks: 79,71,71,63,50,60,61,70,59.

For those that don’t understand indexes, that mean that hunters were 59% more popular than the average 10-19, but only 9% above average at 85. Warlocks were only 21% below average at the start, and a whopping 41% below average at 85!

I took Jason’s suggestion and indexed the leveling data, a stats term for assigning the average value to 100 and then comparing each value to it in succession.

So we start with our original leveling data from the WarcraftRealms Census:

Leveling characters as percentage of total census population

We then turn it into an index so we can more clearly see how each value deviates from the average value for that bracket. What’s better, we can now track the changes accurately over the leveling process – no longer do we have to wave our hands and ignore the effect of DKs changing the average value midway through the process.

Where’s what the index values look like.

Indexed values of character populations through levels 10-85

The average value of this index is 100, so values over 100 represent classes which are more represented at that level.

Here is the same data, this time presented as percent deviation from the average:

Percent deviation from average character population per class, 10-85

The Class Distribution Spreadsheet has been updated with a new tab for this information.

This data shows how under or over represented a class really is, compared to what the average should be. At level 10-19, Mages and Warriors are about where the average is, while Hunters are a whopping 59% more!

Using the index helps explain and quantify one of the things I was trying to articulate with the Mage numbers: even though they start at 11% of the population at level 10-19, and end at 11% at 85, they experienced growth as measured by the average.

The index also allows us to measure the relative deviation from the norm for each class as they level. We can clearly see things like:

  • If you get through the first 40 levels on a Pally, chances are you’re going to stick with them through endgame.
  • Hunters are even more prevalent at lower levels than your average WSG twink game would have you believe. They remain popular all the way up through endgame, when they get put aside for other toons.
  • Warriors are oddly struggling at higher levels. Is this due to the sudden difficulty increase of Cata dungeons at level 80? Gear dependency with rapidly inflating item level curves? Or is it an endgame effect? I honestly don’t know.
  • There are a lot of Death Knights just out of the starter zone.

But what the data shows regarding Warlocks is disturbing.

Warlocks drop in popularity by 20% between level 19 and level 85. There is no level that they are a popular class. None.

People don’t want to try them, and when they do, they don’t stick with the class to endgame. They barely make it to level 40, for crying out loud!

I thought that the 6.7% figure of total endgame population was pretty bad. I think the -37% at 40-49 and -41% at 85 is worse, because it shows that the class is in trouble through the majority of the game.

Keep this in mind as you hear about Warlock developments in Mists.

(Thank you, Jason, for suggesting this way of looking at the data.)

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Filed under Cynwise's Warcraft Manual, Warlockery

Where Did All The Warlocks Go in Cataclysm?

This is the first post in The Decline and Fall of Warlocks in Cataclysm series.

Where have all the warlocks gone?

I heard this question more and more often as Cataclysm progressed. Raid leaders struggled to recruit them. Players didn’t see them in LFD, or later, in LFR. Battleground appearances became increasingly rare. Leveling warlocks became an elusive beast for me to find on my own leveling tanks and healers.

It’s not like warlocks were hugely popular in Wrath of the Lich King, but I didn’t recall quite so many people asking me questions like this one. Some of the major kills of that expansion featured warlocks prominently – remember Stars doing Yogg-0 and all those Drain Soul beams? – but Cataclysm had those kinds of moments, too. I remember several Demonology warlocks in the world first Heroic Rag video. DPS was never so lackluster that it couldn’t keep up. Warlocks weren’t getting benched for playing warlocks … they just became scarce.

At the same time, I went through my own problems playing my warlock main, Cynwise. At first I thought it was due to my dissatisfaction with the PvP endgame at the end of Season 9, but as the months ticked by and I made no effort to pick up a warlock, any warlock, I found myself wondering if it was really the endgame I didn’t enjoy in Cataclysm – or warlocks. I had become one of the missing warlocks, and I didn’t even really know why.

Was it me? Was it the class? I felt very uncomfortable extrapolating my own experience out to warlocks in general. The specific incident that knocked me off my warlock main was too personal, too isolated. It didn’t really have anything to do with warlocks at all – it had much more to do with the gear transition in endgame PvP, a lack of interest in raiding, and a desire to see more of the lower brackets.

Maybe it was just perception that there were fewer warlocks out there. Just because I’ve fallen out of love with a class doesn’t mean that the class is broken, right? People change. I changed. I learned to love healing and tanking, for crying out loud! What kind of a warlock likes to tank things that aren’t the floor?

The plural of anecdote isn’t data.

I stopped playing a warlock when 4.2 was released. She went from my main to a neglected tailoring alt over the course of Cataclysm.

But the months ticked by, fewer people talked to me about the hexenfreude of playing a warlock, and more asked me what was wrong with the class. I had to wonder:

Was I the only one?

THE POPULARITY CONTEST

Are warlocks less popular now than they used to be? That’s the question we must start with – is the decline one of perception only, or is it based in fact?

Comparing WoW census figures from the end of Wrath (patch 3.3.5) and what is presumably the last patch of Cataclysm (4.3.2) indicate that the answer to this is definitively yes.

Warlocks are less popular now than they were at the end of Wrath.

This data is taken from two sources: Armory Data Mining (fortunately, not updated since 3.3.5) and World of Wargraphs. (Here’s the spreadsheet if you want to follow along.) Without knowing the methodology between these two censuses it’s difficult to assign a high certainty between comparing between different data sources, but these numbers appear to be consistent across other census sites. Let’s go with them as being at least relatively accurate.

  • Three classes experienced significant declines in their playerbase: Paladins, Death Knights, and Warlocks. All three of these had substantial changes to their mechanics in Cataclysm.
  • Two classes had statistically significant increases: Mages and Hunters. Hunters received substantial changes to their mechanics in Cataclysm; this is somewhat counter evidence to the opinion that the change to Focus from Mana was bad for the class.
  • Three classes had small gains in popularity: Shamans, Druids, and Warriors.
  • Two classes stayed about the same: Priests and Rogues.

There are several key points I’d like to raise from this data set.

Paladins and Death Knights suffered a larger decline in popularity than Warlocks (2.1% and 1.9% respectively), but because their relative popularity (#1 and #2 in Wrath) was so much higher, the loss was less noticeable.

The Wrath numbers for Death Knights and Paladins may have also been inflated by the Legendary Effect, where more players were playing classes with a current tier legendary (Shadowmourne) available for them. What’s interesting is that we don’t see a corresponding rise in warlocks competing for their legendary, which is only one raiding teir past current (and still exceptionally good), while we do see a corresponding rise in the popularity of Rogues with their legendary in this tier.

Class popularity concentrated in a few classes in Wrath, with the outliers (Paladins, DKs) skewing high. There’s a nice little clump of 6 classes between 7.5% and 9.1%, Warriors are pretty close to even at 10.1%, and then there are the popular classes (Druid, DK, Paladin.) There isn’t an absence of Warlocks, Rogues, Hunters and Shaman in this distribution – rather, there’s a lot of people playing Paladins! Players notice that there was an abundance of a certain class, not an absence.

In Cataclysm, the popular classes became less popular and – overall – classes were more evenly distributed. There’s a nice clump of 4 classes at 10-11%, a clump of 2 at 9.3% and the popular classes (Paladins and Druids) at 12-13%. There’s less of a range between those 8 classes than in the previous model.

But notice that the outliers shifted from the high to the low end. Rogues are, relatively speaking, less popular compared to Hunters and Shamans than they used to be, even if their popularity hasn’t changed. Warlocks are even worse off – not only did they decline in popularity overall, they’ve declined relative to the standard set by other classes. No longer do you notice that there are Paladins everywhere; you notice the absence of Warlocks.

The salient feature of Wrath’s class popularity distribution was the abundance of Paladins and Death Knights; the salient feature of Cataclysm’s class distribution is the dearth of Warlocks.

It’s interesting that this is both a decline in fact and in perception.

UNDERPOWERED, OVERPOWERED, OUT OF POWER

So why are Warlocks in decline? Are they particularly bad at a particular area of the game? Is this a problem of balance, or power? Is this a case where warlocks are just plain underpowered? Are people making rational choices in raiding by shunning warlocks? Are they just bad in PvP? While I hadn’t heard of any of these problems, perhaps there was a rational reason to choose another class.

I first looked at DPS in heroic raids. While heroic raids don’t represent the entire universe of PvE, they’re a good place to start when looking at DPS. I took a quick look at Raidbot’s DPSbot and 25m H encounters:

Huh. Nothing in the last two months, really. Warlocks are solidly middle of the pack performers in hard mode raiding. Unlike some classes, their three specs are pretty well balanced between each other.

Maybe we need to look further back. Let’s expand our view for the last year.

Okay, now we’ve got a lot more data, with more diversity in the data set, so we can see trends over the expansion.

  • In 4.1, Affliction is one of the top DPS specs, sharing the lead with Shadow Priests and Arcane Mages. Balance Druids, MM Hunters, and Arms Warriors are also very strong. Demo and Destro are in the second tier of DPS.
  • In 4.2, Affliction is no longer top of the DPS, but still competitive. Demonology remains mid-tier, while Destruction drops like a rock to the bottom of the charts.
  • In 4.3, Affliction, Demonology, and Destruction are all mid-tier DPS performers. If you zoom in to various displays of the data on the linked site, Affliction is still the top Warlock performer, while Destruction has improved substantially.

So the picture that emerges of Warlock DPS is … it’s fine. I know that’s a judgement call, but realistically, it hasn’t been bad, and it’s even been pretty good at times. It hasn’t been so awesome that it’s an outlier (like Fire Mages an Shadow Priests), but at the same time, it hasn’t really struggled. It’s a solid performer.

What’s interesting is that all three specs have had a pretty good run of it in Cataclysm – more so than any other pure DPS class. Mages have tended to have one superior spec in PvE at any given time, either Arcane or Fire. Hunters have had wildly erratic performance in PvE, with Survival either great or terrible, but Marskmanship and Beast Mastery lagging behind. Rogues have also been forced into Combat or Assassination, mostly Combat. Except for a period in 4.2 with Destruction falling way behind, all three Warlock specs were viable for Cataclysm raiding.

That’s pretty remarkable, isn’t it? You’d think that having viable choices for your PvE spec would be a benefit, wouldn’t it?

Nothing in the DPS rankings says that the class needed to be buffed dramatically. While there are some superior choices at specific times, there were few classes that were consistently better. Shadow Priests, maybe? Mages weren’t until they got the Fire buffs of 4.3.

So maybe there’s something more going on here than just straight DPS problems. Let’s go back to popularity and see if that sheds any light on how warlocks have done in raids.

One of the great things about the World of Wargraphs site is that it allows you to drill down to a specific environment, and compare how a class/spec combo does there, versus its overall popularity. This is important, because it allows you to avoid bias. If you looked at population distribution and said: 15% of everyone who killed 8 HM bosses was a Druid, therefore druids are overpowered in HM PVE content, you’d be making an erroneous statement. You have to compare this to the overall population – if 30% of all players played Druids, but only 15% killed HM bosses, Druids might be underpowered. Or Druids might have a disadvantage in PvE. Or there might be another class which is simply better than Druids at their tasks.

Let’s take a real example of this. Here’s the current distribution of classes of all characters who have killed at 4+ heroic raid bosses this tier.

Class Distribution in Heroic Raids, 4.3.3 (From World of Wargraphs)

Looking at only this data, you might conclude that Paladins, Priests, and Druids are better at heroic raiding, and Death Knights, Hunters, and Warlocks are worse at it. But this would be incorrect. You might have more Priests raiding than Shaman simply because there are more Priests playing the game, not because Priests have some natural advantages in raids.

When we take the data and mash it up against the global popularity percentages, we get numbers like this:

Class Popularity in 4.3.3 - 4+ Heroic Bosses Killed

4.3.3 Class Distribution - 4+ Heroic Bosses Killed

This allows us to see which classes tend to be brought to heroic raids a bit more than average (those with green Popularity Deltas) versus those who are not (those with red scores). Priests and Hunters make up about the same amount of the player base, but one gets brought to the heroic raids more often (Priests).

The remarkable thing about Warlocks? They appear to be properly represented in heroic raids. They’re appealing enough to bring at the same rate as the general lock population. No advantages, but no real disadvantages, either.

The hybrid nature of some classes might throw these numbers off, though. We’re not really being fair to hybrids by lumping them all together – you might have a great healing spec but an awful DPS spec, which would balance things out.

Okay! Let’s look at it by spec, then.

4.3.3 Class/Spec Distribution - 4+ Heroic Bosses Killed

This chart not only shows which specs are currently raiding hard modes successfully, but which ones are disproportionately good (or bad) at it. Survival Hunters make up only 3.1% of the WoW population, yet account for 7.5% of successful hard mode raiders. I think it’s safe to say that Survival is a good raiding spec. A Beast Mastery hunter, on the other hand, is scarce in hard mode raiding (only 0.3%), yet is 2.7% of the total population.

In this case, the results we see here match the results we saw looking at DPS. That’s good! This shows that for Hunters, at least, if you want to do Heroic Raids, you go for the one that produces the best DPS – which, right now, is Survival. I like it when data matches up like this, and we see it in other specs and classes, too. Fire Mage? Overrepresented. Frost Mage? Under.

Warlocks are a pretty small sample size, but we still see some parallels between the DPS scores and popularity. Each spec is equally represented, 2%-2.6%. Interestingly, Destruction is the most popular spec, and both it and Demonology are slightly more popular than their global populations. Affliction is less so. These don’t quite match the DPS figures that we saw earlier, but this might be because the current tier requires more burst, which both Destro and Demo deliver better than Affliction. The perception is that Destro was buffed and Affliction is weak right now. We find statements like the following boilerplate from the Elitist Jerks warlock guides:

With the release of Patch 4.3 the warlock class sees a number of changes, in particular the Destruction spec, along with a few changes to the Demonology spec. Following these changes we see that all 3 specs are quite close, and all have something to bring to the table. For single target DPS, the following should be true at all gear levels:

Demonology > Destruction >= Affliction

While Demonology does pull ahead in single target DPS by ~2k DPS, this is only in close to perfect conditions where there is minimal to no movement and the player is able to stand in melee range. This means that in most situations Destruction and Affliction will perform better than Demonology.

On multi-target fights with strictly 2 DPS targets Affliction and Destruction should be quite even. However once any additional targets are introduced Affliction will perform considerably better than Destruction. Heavy AoE fights are where Demonology really begins to shine, followed respectably by Affliction and then Destruction behind by a considerable margin.

As confusing as they are, I think these observations are pretty accurate. All three specs are quite close, and knowing their strengths and weaknesses is important when deciding which spec to play on which fight.

This leads to an interesting observation about specs. When there’s a clearly superior DPS spec for a class in raiding (e.g. Survival, Fire) players will flock to it. When two or three specs are raid viable, other considerations factor into the decision making process and muddy the water. We should not assume that having three viable raiding specs is better than only having one; Warlocks might have choices, but that isn’t drawing people to raid with the class more than, say, Survival Hunters or Shadow Priests. It may be more flexible, but it isn’t necessarily more appealing.

For Warlocks, there isn’t an easy choice of spec in raiding right now. Should you go Demo/Destro on Spine for burst, or stay Affliction? Do you have the gear to switch between Destro and Demo? Will you be multidotting, or just handling a few adds? Which spec is the player more skilled at playing?

Aside from having more spec choices than any other DPS class, there doesn’t appear to be anything wrong with Warlocks in PvE raids.

Warlocks aren’t underpowered in heroic raids, but neither are they overpowered.

THE GREAT MYSTERY OF PVP AND RLS SYNERGY

If Warlocks are doing okay in PvE, perhaps poor performance in PvP is driving players away from the class.

I dunno. It could happen!

I toss this theory out because if you’ve leveled a Warlock lately in PvP, you know that battlegrounds can be tough on you. You have to have exceptionally good gear to succeed, and even then you’ll probably die a lot. I don’t think this theory holds at the endgame – warlocks have traditionally been pretty potent in PvP – but we should test it out.

The following graph presents all classes in all rated PvP environments  – Arenas, Rated Battlegrounds – with a rating of 2200+.

This is the first population chart where Warlocks are not on the bottom. Not only are they not at the bottom, Warlocks are disproportionately well represented in highly ranked PvP.

Class Distribution in 4.3.3 PvP (Season 11) - 2200+ Rating

There are classes which do better at rated PvP play than others, and Warlocks are on that list. If you look through the current 3v3 comp ratings, Warlocks are part of the dominant comp (RLS, Rogue Lock Shaman), and integral parts of most of the other comps.

3v3 Comp Popularity in Season 11 - 2200+ Ratings

The structure of 3v3 is usually straightforward: healer, controller, burst. Affliction Warlocks have the right tools to apply constant pressure on the healer, they’re hard to kill, they have great CC, and they can put out a lot of damage. What they can’t do is burst, which is why pairing them with a Rogue works so well. And Shaman healing works really well with Affliction PvP – Spirit Link totem is one of the keys to this synergy.

The PvP data on World of Wargraphs tells this story in a lot of different ways. It doesn’t matter what Arena size it is, there are a disproportionate number of ranked Warlocks in it.

  • 5v5 they are practically essential (Affliction is top spec, 12.7% of all players).
  • 3v3 they are dominant (#4, 8.5%).
  • 2v2 they’re respectable (#7, 6.1%).
  • Even rated battlegrounds, which I thought might have some falloff, sees 10.2% of all players as Warlocks – just behind Rogues.

That pretty much means every rated BG team is going to have a warlock – if they can find one.

The data tells a story about a class which is exceptionally good at ranked PvP, especially when working with several other players. They might be weak on their own, but they are very potent in a group. They are a damage support class, providing pressure everywhere. Other classes keep them alive or burn down the opponents; Afflocks provide the control and damage needed to create those openings.

Rogues are in a similar position; great PvP abilities, great PvE output, relatively low numbers. Both classes have received legendaries in Cataclysm, though Warlocks shared theirs with other caster DPS. Rogues are currently enjoying a renaissance of sorts in Dragon Soul, with their legendaries providing both class interest and top DPS for a class which has deserved some love for some time.

Hunters are in the opposite position. Terrible in ranked PvP, a single PvE spec doing well in raids after struggling for much of the expansion, and a completely reworked resource system. But Hunter popularity is up, and Warlock popularity continue to slip.

There isn’t anything wrong with the Warlock numbers.  That’s what’s so frustrating about this problem. The class isn’t out of balance, it’s not pulling in low DPS, and it’s doing really well in PvP.

So why the hell are people not playing warlocks anymore?

WHEN YOU HAVE ELIMINATED THE IMPOSSIBLE

The preceding sections tried to establish facts of the case:

  • Are Warlocks in decline? Yes.
  • Do they have DPS issues in raids? No, they even have some advantages over other pure DPS classes. DPS looks okay.
  • Are there problems in rated PvP? No. They’re part of the most dominant comp this season. Locks are consistently represented with high rankings.

The two most obvious reasons players would not choose Warlocks at the endgame – that they have performance issues in PvE, PvP, or both – are just not there. Especially when we look at the expansion as the whole, the data simply doesn’t support the idea that Locks can’t hack it. They can. They can shine.

They just aren’t.

So we must look elsewhere for answers.

My first theory about the data we’ve looked at is that it is very focused on level 85 play – and the upper tier of endgame play at that – which is why it fails to explain the lack of Warlocks. Heroic raiding and 2200+ PvP are not the activities of the majority of the player base, but they are activities which receive a lot of scrutiny from both players and developers. This upper tier endgame bias allows us to focus on the potential maximums of each spec, as well as see how a class is performing in demanding conditions, but it doesn’t represent everyone at 85, let alone everyone in the game.

PvP is not balanced around any level other than 85, and arguably it is only balanced for rated PvP play at level 85. Several detrimental changes were made to regular battlegrounds during the course of Cataclysm to solve problems that only existed in rated play. Changes were made to classes based upon their performance in Arenas, not regular battlegrounds. The emphasis of Cataclysm was getting players into Rated Battlegrounds, which meant that they were the (flawed) yardstick by which all PvP was measured.

PvE is a different beast, but the fundamental assumption is that balance still happens at 85. I think that the different buff and nerf cycles experienced in Cataclysm support this. I can’t say that they’re not looking at performances in 5-man content or daily content, but we don’t see a lot of changes aimed at fixing balance in those activities. Raids are where the logs are. Raids drive the nerfs and buffs.

So this theory surmises that the problem with Warlocks is not visible in the endgame data because the data is looking at the wrong activities. It’s looking at the endgame. Perhaps there’s something wrong with the class at endgame – people rolled warlocks, but end up not playing them at the endgame.

There could be a few things going on here.

  1. Warlocks attempt to raid/PvP at endgame, but stop for some reason other than their performance. Possible reasons include class mechanics, better buffs from other classes, easier to gear other classes through raid content/5-mans.
  2. Warlocks get to 85, don’t attempt to raid at all, but enjoy other endgame content.
  3. Warlocks get to 85, but are not played in the endgame at all, and the player rerolls or quits.
  4. Warlocks never get to 85, and therefore never get to endgame content.

The population popularity comparison is about the only data that we have to go on for the first point, but it’s telling that Warlocks are fairly represented in heroic raids compared to the general population (6.7%). If you want to raid, you can, and you can do well. If you are a serious raider leveling to 85, you’re about as likely to raid on a Warlock as a different class.

Casual raiders, of course, might have a different story. Warlocks might do well if executed perfectly, but if their rotation has less margin for error, then there could be a problem between the upper tier or raiders and the masses at 85. So we can’t rule the first possibility out just yet.

The second possibility is that people level their locks to 85 and choose to not raid on them, but do other things. Hunters and DKs appear to be in this situation – they are underrepresented in their raid popularity compared to their overall population. Warlocks, as break even, don’t seem to be here.

Three and four are different but would look the same to most of the data we have, just because the data appears to measure active 85s. We need to look at different data – in this case, realm population data across all levels, not just endgame data.

We have to find out if people are even bothering to level warlocks.

RISING THROUGH THE LEVELS

I was talking about this post with Narci from Flavor Text, and she was kind enough (thanks, Narci!) to cull the following data on class populations in different level ranges from Warcraft Realms:

Class population percentages, by leveling bracket, in 4.3.3

Let’s look at these graphed out, too.

Active Character Level Distribution by Class in 4.3.3

The Warlock line is there below everyone else. It doesn’t start there, but once it crosses the Shaman line around level 20 it never really recovers.

The introduction of Death Knights at 55 causes a population depression in all the other classes because, without warning, over a quarter of the player base is playing a DK at level 55-60. So we should ignore that anomaly, throw out the 50-69 data, and keep it in mind for the the 70-80 data. It skews comparisons for all the other classes, too, because there are only 9 classes represented at 1-10, and 10 at 85. Mages might be 11% at 1 and 11% at 85, but that’s actually an increase in popularity because of the larger number of classes at 85.

Look at Paladins! They start off behind a lot of other classes, but the loyalty shown at 85 is remarkable! There’s a 2% gain of total population share between 84 and 85, which means that people level them to 85 and play them there. Paladins like playing at the endgame. It looks like Druids – and Shaman – do this as well.

Hunters are almost the complete opposite – heavily loaded at the low levels, with a constant decline all the way up. Hunters are excellent leveling toons, and are extremely strong at low level PvP. As they get older they get more complex and less dominant, driving people to put down the class for a while.

It’s really amazing how popular Hunters are at the character selection screen. I wonder if this is because of the new races available to them? Does adding a class to a popular race increase its popularity? It’s something we have to consider when talking about class changes – Hunters got Humans and Forsaken, Warlocks got Dwarves and Trolls.

I like Dwarves, but very few people actually play them.

There are 3228 Dwarf Warlocks and 3867 Troll Warlocks on US and Euro servers versus 34,366 Human and 10,783 Forsaken Hunters (data from Warcraft Realms again).  Even if those numbers aren’t absolutely correct, they’re relatively correct. Hunters benefited more from their new races than Warlocks.

Unlike most classes, Warlocks decline as they level. There’s a slight decline from 80-84 to 85, which might represent people leveling to endgame and then dropping the character, but it’s not huge. They decline a bit (3%) through the leveling process, but that’s nothing like what happens to Rogues (5%). I think you have a stronger case for saying people have started a lot of Rogues but not gotten them to endgame than you do with Warlocks – 3% could be just noise in the system from the DK bump, plus, there’s the Rogue Legendary Carrot – but there is still something going on there. The trajectory is never one of growth, unlike Paladins.

I think if I had to break apart this data, I’d summarize it as follows:

  • Hunters and Death Knights are initially very attractive at character creation and for early leveling, but are normally represented at endgame. Death Knights are probably skewed because of farming/banking toons.
  • Rolling a Rogue is extremely popular right now, likely due to the Legendary Effect, but leveling them to endgame is a challenge.
  • Warriors and Warlocks are somewhat more popular at character creation than at endgame. There may be leveling problems with these classes.
  • Priests, Shaman, Mages, and Druids all increase their popularity  from 1 to 85. The relatively consistent numbers (or slight increases) are subject to the DK effect, making 11% at 85 mean more than 11% at level 10.
  • Paladins dramatically increase in popularity at endgame. They may not be the easiest class to level to 85, but once there, people play them.

Warlocks aren’t a popular choice at creation. I think it’s safe to say that – they’re not Hunters or Death Knights or Druids. But they are also not complete pariahs – people are choosing Warlocks at about the same rate as Priests and Shaman.

I had a theory that one of the reasons Rogues and Warlocks aren’t popular classes is because they’re the “bad guys” of the character creation screen. Both classes have evil flavor and feel to them – Warlocks perhaps even moreso than Rogues. Warlocks aren’t paragons of virtue, defenders of nature, or even very heroic – at best they’re ruthlessly efficient, at worst they’re evil incarnate.

But the data doesn’t really support that. People do choose to try out Warlocks, just not a lot of them – and even fewer make it all the way to the 85 with them.

Update: There is a followup post to the data in this section, Leveling Data on Warlocks is Worse than I Thought, based on Jason’s comment on this post. I was wrong about some of the data this preceeding section – I was overly optimistic and conservative in my interpretation of the leveling data on Warlocks, and should have been more open about how bad the situation is. Looking at the data in a different way revealed a different situation.

Thanks to Jason for his comment and guidance in building this data model.

THAT WHICH REMAINS, NO MATTER HOW IMPROBABLE

Where have the Warlocks gone?

I started this post with some ideas in my head about what caused the decline between Wrath and Cataclysm, and why Warlocks are just not getting played. The problems with the class’s unpopularity in Wrath were only exacerbated by Cataclysm. 

Fewer players are playing Warlocks. People who are noticing that there aren’t as many Warlocks in game are absolutely correct. It’s not that there is something wrong with their performance at the endgame – both PvE and PvP performance is adequate at the high end – but something is driving players away.

Leveling data suggests that the character concept is not the problem. People are rolling them, albeit not as many as other classes. Something happens between rolling the character and getting them into endgame content which causes the class to fall into disfavor. It may be questing, it may be dungeons, it may be battlegrounds. It may be class mechanics.

But something happens.

Here’s the conclusion I was hoping to avoid: people simply don’t like playing warlocks. It’s not that they don’t try them; they do.

Players simply stop playing them.

Some of them, no doubt, give up on Warcraft entirely. There’s plenty of evidence that that has happened. But it’s also likely that they look at other classes and switch. It’s likely that players are migrating to the classes which they find to be the most fun.

And they aren’t finding Warlocks fun enough to stick with them.

Next week, I’ll dig into why this is happening to Warlocks, and what Blizzard is doing to address the problem.

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How Warlock DoTs Work in Cataclysm, Part II: DoT Refreshing, Proc Stacking, and Getting Your Warlock Black Belt

In my post How Warlock DoTs Work in Cataclysm I went into detail about how Cataclysm’s significant changes to Haste mechanics affected Warlock damage over time spells. Haste went from a simple DPS increase to adding DPCT breakpoints, Haste values where DoTs gained new ticks and dramatically increased their importance.

There were a few other smaller changes to DoTs that were made at the end of Wrath of the Lich King that I didn’t talk about in that article, as well as how the new refresh mechanics work in Cataclysm, which I should have covered. The Haste changes were so big that talking about Spellpower and Critical Strike didn’t seem as important at the time. Mea culpa; I get enough email questions about how refreshing works that I realize I should have tackled these stats, too.

UPDATING DOTS: DYNAMIC VERSUS STATIC STAT UPDATES

What happens to DoTs when your combat abilities change mid-combat? If you get a proc from Power Torrent or Eradication, what happens to your Corruption or Unstable Affliction spells? You might think that all procs are handled the same way, and that the game client updates all DoTs automatically when you get a proc.

Not quite.

DoTs update all player-based values – Haste, Spellpower, Crit – upon cast or refresh. When you cast the DoT, the client takes your current combat values and buffs and computes the spell duration, ticks, crit rate, and damage. These values then remain until the DoT is refreshed, at which time new values are applied.

DoTs update all enemy-based values – debuffs like Haunt, Shadow Embrace, Curse of the Elements – every tick, regardless of cast or refresh. When you gain another stack of Shadow Embrace, all of your DoTs are affected without refresh. If Haunt falls off, the next tick of Unstable Affliction will lose 20% damage.

There is a lot of confusion on this matter. One reason for the confusion is the spell tooltip for your DoTs will update dynamically for all player-based buffs. If you get a Haste proc, the duration will fluctuate if you’re mousing over the tooltip. If Dark Intent is cast upon you after casting Corruption, the duration in the Corruption tooltip will drop. If you’re testing this out on a training dummy, your WoW client will make it look like Haste procs are taking effect. But if you look at the number of ticks each DoT has, you will never gain a new tick from a Haste proc without recasting or refreshing the spell.

The only time a DoT updates for buffs on the Warlock is when it’s refreshed, either through a hard cast or a refreshing ability (i.e. Everlasting Affliction, Pandemic, or Fel Flame). This is a change from how things worked in Wrath, which contributes to the confusion.

See, in Wrath, DoT values would be set on cast, but not on refresh. Refreshing a spell maintained the values it was originally cast with, leading DPS player to prepot and trinket before entering combat, blow trinkets before refreshing DoTs, and generally making initial casts as powerful as possible so that the refresh mechanics could maintain that high damage DoT for the entire fight. Really skilled DPS learned how to reset their DoTs when big procs happened – any Warlock who cleared their Corruption with Seed of Corruption just to take advantage of the Nevermelting Ice Crystal remembers what I’m talking about. You could boost your DPS by huge amounts just by preserving a series of procs.

This was changed near the end of Wrath, in patch 3.3.5, so that an automatic refresh of the the DoT updated all combat values on that DoT. If you got a lucky proc, you couldn’t apply it for the entirety of the boss fight.

The system that exists in Cataclysm is in some ways simpler by changing how DoTs are refreshed – you could now clip the last tick of your DoT without reducing your DPS – but that mechanical change introduced a new set of decisions into optimizing your DPS.

THE TWO SECOND RULE, AND WHEN TO BREAK IT

All other things being equal, Warlocks should refresh DoTs when they hit 2 seconds or less. This rule of thumb serves for Warlocks because our only fast-ticking DoT (Bane of Agony) is also the only one that you never clip, so we can ignore it. Everything else has a 3-second or greater base tick, which Haste almost never modifies below two seconds. So Warlocks can use the two-second rule with impunity, and it will serve their DPS well by never allowing DoTs to fall off the target.

Refreshing DoTs in this way is a path to good, solid DPS. But if you want to try advanced DPS techniques, you’re going to have to engage in some creative use of game mechanics. You’ll have to know your procs well, know how to refresh quickly, and learn to juggle refreshes to give you maximum uptime when procs occur.

The general idea is to take advantage of procs with a fairly long duration – 20 seconds or so – and get your DoTs ticking with the enhanced values at the start of the proc, but then refresh them before the proc drops off, effectively doubling the duration of the proc.

Make sense?

This gets tricky to apply in actual usage, so let’s consider two different methods: one that follows the two second rule while triggering Demon Soul, and one that tries to optimize uptime of the proc.

We’ll use a standard Affliction DPS rotation but ignore Haste and Bane of Agony for now. (Banes are a special case we need to consider later.) Demon is the Felhunter for the 20% damage increase. The Warlock in question has all DoTs rolling on a target when she hits Demon Soul. UA has 10 seconds left, Corruption has 8, Haunt’s got 4 seconds on CD.

I’ve illustrated these two methods in a separate spreadsheet (Warlock DoT Refresh Examples 1.0) so you can follow along; each cell represents a half-second of time in game.

(Click to embiggen)

Method 1: Haunt on CD, 2 second rule. This straightforward method yields pretty good uptime of Demon Soul on the two DoTs, giving 24 seconds of enhanced damage to Corruption and 15 seconds to Unstable Affliction. 9 Shadow Bolts were cast during the 35.5 seconds plotted out. Considering that Corruption’s normal duration is 18 seconds, this is pretty good.

Method 2: Timed refreshes, keep Haunt up (but not cast on CD). This method is more unorthodox: instead of casting Haunt on CD and following a normal rotation, prioritize getting DoTs recast, even if that means hard casting Corruption if Haunt is on CD. Getting all DoTs rolling with Demon Soul affecting them, and refreshing them as the buff is about to drop, is more important than any of the normal filler spells with this method.

And oh boy, while you might only get 25 seconds of enhanced damage on Corruption doing it this way, you get 29 seconds of Demon Soul + Unstable Affliction with this method, all at the cost of 1 Shadow Bolt – you fire off 8 instead of 9 with method 2.

Now, in this very simple example, if the 20% damage that you’d get from those 4 extra UA ticks outweighs the damage you’d lose from the Shadow Bolt, then Method 2 yields higher DPS. If it doesn’t, then it’s not useful and you just stick to the 2 second rule.

But real DPS isn’t quite this simple.

PROC CHAINING AND BLACK BELTS

If we were only talking about a single buff, then breaking the 2 second rule isn’t very appealing, to be honest. There are a lot of adjustments that need to be made for a marginal DPS gain.

But the key is to chain procs and stack buffs so that it’s not just a single buff affecting your DoTs refreshes.

Instead of just popping Demon Soul whenever it’s on CD, time it to correspond to other buffs – Power Torrent, Metamorphosis, a trinket proc, Heroism/Bloodlust, Eradication. Macro your on-use trinkets to abilities like Demon Soul or Metamorphosis. Make sure you use those Volcanic Potions. Watch for procs off your enchants and time your CDs accordingly. Details matter.

It’s tempting to take on-use trinkets and just macro them in to your normal attack rotation. It’s a good way to ensure that your trinkets are firing all the time, so that you’re getting maximum average benefit from them. I did this myself for a long time, so that my initial casts were always potent.

But I’ve learned is that to really get the great DPS, you have to have more control over your buffs than that. Waiting 15 seconds for a Black Magic or Power Torrent proc to pop Demon Soul and a spellpower trinket really hits hard. Chaining Metamorphosis, a trinket, and a potion all that the same time – and then hitting Immo Aura – is awesome.

Also consider your spell choice. I ignored Bane of Agony in my example above, but you should ask yourself – what happens if I switch Banes and put Bane of Doom on my target during time when I’ve got 5 procs going? Bane of Doom becomes a monster DPS increase, that’s what! It takes all the buffs from short, 10-20 second procs, and applies them over the course of a minute. Bane of Agony might gain a lot during 24 of those seconds, but there will be a second BoA cast that is unbuffed during that minute. Bane of Doom absolutely should get refreshed during a proc stack.

All of these details can seem daunting when you first approach it. What procs should you look for? How should you tie them together? What if they’re not lining up well, what if I wait for the perfect storm and it never comes?

But really, it’s not that complicated. There are only so many procs and cooldowns you need to track. You probably have a weapon enchant, and a trinket or two. There’s Demon Soul and Dark Intent at endgame for CDs, and you may have an on-use trinket, too. You may be in raiding gear with a proc that enhances your damage.

Once you’ve figured out which buffs could be impacting your DoT damage, you can start chaining them together. Macro Meta + trinket or Demon Soul + trinket to make sure that your boost is as strong as it can be when you sacrifice fillers for DoTing. Time your potion use for these burn phases. Make sure your Infernal or Doomguard some out during proc chains, not after.

You may want to consider customizing your interface to help display procs better. Power Auras/Weak Auras, Need to Know, Tell Me When – there are many addons which can give you a better view into which buffs are happening now, and, more importantly, what you need to do with them.

Raid buffs can be tricky to manage, but the challenge is more in coordinating your actions with your team members’s than in knowing what buffs are coming your way. You want to have already summoned your Infernal or Doomguard before Heroism/Bloodlust so they benefit, not after. But you don’t want to blow your other CDs until after they’ve cast it and you get some random procs, too!

It can be tricky. But it’s navigable.  It’s knowable.

Knowing just when to do these things is how you get your black belt in raiding, in PvP, and in warlockery.

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Warlock (and other) Class Feedback

Blizzard has opened up threads on their forums asking for player feedback on how specific classes are playing.

We’re looking for feedback on your class as we work on changes and adjustments for a future game update. While we may be making some specific class changes in 4.3, what we’re looking for in this thread is overall feeling on the class as a whole for more long term changes in the future.

Here’s the Warlock Feedback thread. Each class has their own sticky thread right now.

Here’s my response. If you agree with it, I’d appreciate if you’d hit the Like button. If you just like the instant cast flying demon form idea for warlocks – and who doesn’t? – be sure to mention it in your own response.

I think it’s important that if you have an opinion on a class, any class, you take a few minutes to put down your thoughts. It’s rare that a company openly solicits feedback like this, and while it’s being presented in a format which makes me think it’s effectively going to be treated like a survey, it’s a survey which is going to be read.

If you’re playing a few hours a night, it’s worth taking 5 minutes to let Blizzard know how you feel about the class you’re playing.

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The Lost Puppy and the Girl Everyone Hates: Choosing the Right Demon for your Warlock in 4.0.6

Demons are one of the defining features of the Warlock class. They are not your warlock’s friends.  They are not her companions. They are tools, instruments of your character’s will, to be used and discarded when no longer needed.

And most of all, they are not to be trusted.

But as a player, you will come to trust in your warlock’s demons. Knowing which demon to use, and how to use them effectively, is the mark of a good warlock. Each demon brings with it a different set of abilities, bonuses, and damage that interact with both your spec and your own personal playstyle. Knowing which demon is right for the task at hand is often challenging, but is essential to success in both PvP and PvE.

KNOW YOUR TOOLBOX

You have 5 demons and 2 demon guardians you’ll use at various points in your career as a warlock.

  • Imp: An obnoxious little guy, the Imp’s primary attack is ranged (Firebolt). Abilities include a defensive dispel (Singe Magic), a passive Stamina buff (Blood Pact), and an escape mechanism (Flee). The first demon warlocks learn, Imps are primarily favored by Destruction warlocks in PvE encounters.
  • Voidwalker: Sometimes called a Blueberry or VW, the Voidwalker is the warlock’s tank, dealing damage through melee attacks with high threat (Torment). As a tank, the Voidwalker has a viable taunt (Suffering), a high health pool, and decent armor. He also can surround the warlock in a shield (Sacrifice) and can increase stealth detection while healing outside of combat (Consume Shadows), making him an ideal defensive demon. Great for leveling warlocks.
  • Succubus: Beguiling, seductive, sure to get the wrong kind of attention in Goldshire, the Succubus combines high melee DPS (Lash of Pain) with two great control abilities – a channeled fear you can use when your warlock is incapacitated or busy (Seduction), and a knockback (Whiplash) for interrupting, repositioning, and knocking people off cliffs. She can attack out of nowhere (Lesser Invisibility), and has, arguably, the most irritating pet noises in the game. Great for PvP and general DPS.
  • Felhunter: The demon puppy, the Felhunter is the ultimate anti-caster demon, combining good melee DPS (Shadow Bite) with an offensive Dispel (Devour Magic) and combined Silence/spell lockout (Spell Lock). These abilities are on long cooldowns, but can be combined with other crowd control to really shut down enemy spellcasters. Felpups also bring a passive Mana buff (Fel Intelligence) to the raid, and have traditionally been favored by Affliction warlocks due to talents (now removed) in that tree which buffed his damage. (n.b. Shadow Bite scales for all DoTs, not just affliction.)
  • Felguard: The Felguard, a giant, axe-wielding demon, is only available to Demonology warlocks. If the Voidwalker is the warlock’s Protection Warrior, the Felguard is the Arms warrior, with a devastating cleave attack (Legion Strike), ranged stun (Axe Toss), charge (Pursuit), and nasty whirlwind attack (Felstorm). This adds up into a brutal demon capable of DPSing, tanking, and providing crowd control, and is the signature demon of the Demonologist.

Every single one of these demons provides damage mitigation to the warlock via Soul Link, which should be up at all times.

The demon guardians are a bit different from your demon minions – they are both on a 10 minute CD, no longer displace your normal minion, and are situationally useful. They don’t have individual names, but they are both 1) really big and 2) really cool.

  • Doomguard: The Doomguard has a single ranged attack (Doom Bolt), which it will cast on whichever target you’ve Baned (Doom, Agony, Havoc). Lasts for 45 seconds, theoretically the guardian you’d want to use in a single target situation. Unfortunately, his damage is low right now, but in 4.1 this should be corrected.
  • Infernal: The Infernal is summoned from a fel meteor that crashes into your enemies, stunning them for 2 seconds and then unleashing a large monster made of flaming rock who deals AoE damage to everyone around it. Like the Doomguard, the Infernal will be drawn towards Baned targets, though mostly he runs around and spreads chaos. Awesome for PvP, especially battlegrounds, and currently best for single-target DPS in PvE, too.

Want the short version?

  • Imp: Shoots fireballs, gives stamina buff, defensive dispel on 6-second CD. Destro PvE, some PvP utility.
  • Voidwalker: Blueberry tank, taunt, shield on 30-second CD, anti-stealth. Leveling, soloing, anti-melee and flag defense in PvP.
  • Succubus: Additional CC, knockback on 25-second CD. Generically great for PvP, situationally good for PvE.
  • Felhunter: Anti-caster, offensive dispel on 15-second CD, spell lockout on 24-second CD, damage scales with number of DoTs. Traditionally an Affliction PvE pet, great for PvP when facing casters.
  • Felguard: Demonology only, hits like a truck, ranged stun on 30-second CD, whirlwind attack. Useful in both PvE and PvP.
  • Doomguard: 10-minute CD, shoots shadowbolts, use on single targets after 4.1 buffs his damage.
  • Infernal: 10-minute CD, immolation aura, 2-second stun on deployment, use all the time until 4.1, AoE/PvP thereafter.

That’s it. Five demon minions – four, if you’re not Demonology – and two guardians. That’s what you have to work with.

Now let’s look at when to use them.

THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB

What’s better, a screwdriver, a hammer, or a wrench?

Well, it all depends on what you’re trying to do. If you’re having a discussion about the relative merits of tools, you have to put the discussion in the context of a task, or the discussion is meaningless. In the words of engineers everywhere, you gotta pick the right tool for the job. And demons are your tools.

In many ways, PvE endgame raiding is the easiest context to analyze. As a damage dealer, warlocks are trying to output as much damage as possible. Damage trumps survivability and utility in nearly all cases. In 25-man raids, you can be sure that there’s both a Mage (for the Mana buff) and a Warrior or Priest (for the Stamina buff). In 10-mans, your composition might not include one of these classes, but 10-man raiding often needs to compromise on buffs, or supplement them with Runescrolls if they’re deemed essential buffs.

So, for endgame raiding, pet selection comes down to which one offers the highest DPS for your spec, period, full stop. And that comes down to a per-spec simulation, which is highly dependent upon both the talents and glyphs chosen.

Right now, that means:

These are from the latest (4.0.6) threads on Elitist Jerks (Aff, Demo, Destro). In all cases, you should use macros to force-cast your demon’s basic attack.

In 5-man Cataclysm dungeons, the same philosophy should hold true, but there is an argument to be made for increased need of crowd control, which the Succubus still provides. So there’s no real conflict between DPS and utility in these situations for Affliction and Demonology, and Destruction still gets more benefit out of the Imp to warrant staying with the little guy.

What about PvE, but not at the endgame? This is where the situation becomes less clear. How do you play? What do you play? Are you leveling cautiously, rarely taking any damage or pulling aggro? Voidwalker or Felguard are the demons for you. Do you drain tank and pull recklessly? Voidwalker, Felhunter, and Succubus are all viable demons. Are you playing Destro and nuking everything down before it matters? Keep the Imp out, switch to the VW if you need the shield.

There isn’t really a “right” answer for leveling. Unlike dungeons or heroics, DPS is not the only measure of success in a fight. Survivability, sustainability, utility – all factor into demon selection when leveling.

PvP uses different measures for choosing demons. DPS is, at best, a secondary consideration to the utility each demon brings. Good PvPers will often leave their pets on Passive, attacking specific targets only when necessary, saving their special abilities for when they’re needed, not risking the loss of a demon in return for extra damage.

In general:

  • Voidwalker is for node defense (to sniff out stealthers) and anti-melee. Sacrifice’s shield takes the bite out of a stunlock. VWs can also taunt hunter pets away from healers.
  • Succubus is for crowd control, seduce nuking, DPS, and interrupts. (Also: Lumber Mill.) The ability to CC while your warlock is doing something else – either casting or incapacitated – is key to understanding the succy’s utility.
  • Felhunter is for shutting down enemy casters. You probably can’t kill a Holy Pally as Affliction without smart use of Spell Lock.
  • Imp is for Destruction, with defensive dispels thrown in. Improved Imp procs don’t happen like they do in PvE, but they can provide nice burst. Singe Magic should be used every CD, either on yourself or your healer(s).
  • Felguard is for Demonology, with a combination of cleaves, burst DPS, and stuns, he can be a potent adversary in both Arenas and Battlegrounds.

In PvP, you absolutely need to switch demons to suit your current situation. I cannot stress this point highly enough. You must switch demons to counter your opponents. Every warlock has Soul Burn to allow instant summons in combat; use it. Do not be predictable. Facing a caster? Open with the Succubus, seduce them while DoTting them up, then switch to the Felhunter and lock them down. Getting savaged by a rogue or DK? Switch to the VW, pop a shield, then run away.

You want to know what I don’t want to face as a caster? Surprise Spell Locks!

#showtooltip Summon Felhunter
/use Soulburn
/castsequence reset=1 Summon Felhunter, Spell Lock, Soul Link, Demon Soul

This kind of macro works for all the demons – bring them out instantly, trigger their special ability, then Soul Link them for your own sake. Seduction? Sacrifice? Axe Toss? Singe Magic? All of them are available, almost instantly, on a 30-second CD.

In PvP, the job changes constantly. Sometimes, you’re trying to take out a healer. Sometimes, you’re trying to pull a rogue off of your healer. Sometimes, you’re able to nuke from a distance. Know your tools so you can select the right demon for the job.

Adaptability is key.

SEDUCE-NUKING AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF DEMON DESIGN

I was running some regular battlegrounds with my guildmates last weekend, helping to gear them up with Bloodthirsty gear, when we ran into a Forsaken Destro warlock with a succubus.

“God damn, I hate that succubus!”
“I know, that seduction shit comes out of nowhere!”
“They are the worst demons, period!”

“Except for yours, Cyn. We like yours. Really.”

I cackled at that exchange. Not just because they were lying to me – they totally were, they hate Helola when I duel them – but because it captures the frustration of facing someone who is using a Succubus to seduce-nuke you to death.

Seduce-nuking is a tried and true strategy for Destruction warlocks that was first popularized by the legendary Drakedog in Vanilla WoW. The basic idea is to hold your target immobile with Seduction while lining up a burst combo that they can’t avoid, then repeating until the Fear DR kicks in, at which point you run away until the DR wears off. It goes something like this.

  • Warlock casts CoEl, Succubus comes out of Invisibility and starts channeling Seduction.
  • Warlock casts a long cast nuke, like Chaos Bolt or Soul Fire, while target is immobilized.
  • Nuke leaves Warlock en route to Seduced target. Warlock casts Immolate during travel time.
  • Immediately after Immolate finishes, Warlock casts Shadowfury on the target.
  • Chaos Bolt, Immolate, and Shadowfury all hit at the same time. Target is no longer Seduced, but is stunned.
  • Warlock casts Conflag and Incinerates during Shadowfury stun.
  • During the third Backdraft-enhanced Incinerate, Succubus starts Seducing again, timed to hit after the Incinerate.
  • DoTs get applied while waiting for CDs (Chaos Bolt, Conflagrate, etc.) to reset. Target is Feared as necessary.

There are plenty of different variations on this strategy, and while Destro does seduce-nuking very well, Demo and Affliction can do it too. It’s a devastatingly effective tactic when you learn how to do it.

(Practical challenge for the warlock readers out there: practice getting three spells – Chaos Bolt, Immolate, and Shadowfury – to land at the same time. It will improve your burst immensely. Once you have this down, add in CC.)

Seduce-nuking is not an obvious tactic. You don’t sit there and think, hey, a CC spell that breaks on any damage, I can use that to nuke people to death! It goes against the cardinal rule: Never follow Fear with a nuke, wtf is wrong with you? But once you get it, you see how useful having a separate CC is. It allows you to CC while you are casting other spells.

The key to understanding and using Demon abilities is that, even when they duplicate your own abilities, they are separate from your warlock. They are available when you are not. Sacrifice is a great anti-stunlock spell because you can trigger it while incapacitated, not just because it’s a shield that absorbs damage. Having a shield you can’t use doesn’t help you one bit. Seduction and Whiplash are effective defense mechanisms because they will save you from a lockdown.

I bring up seduce-nuking and the general dislike of the Succubus, in part, because of Tyler Caraway’s recent post on WoW Insider where he asks Do warlock pets need to be redesigned?, which is worth a read – even if I don’t agree with a lot of his assumptions about warlock demons. It’s worth a read because it presents a very common way warlock players look at their demons, and posits that because the Succubus doesn’t have a purpose, a role to fill, she should be removed.

The way in which demons function now, in 4.0.6., is at variance with the ways a lot of warlock players feel that demons should work, because it’s not elegant. It doesn’t fit into a neat, classical model, where each demon neatly fills a role:

  • Leveling: Voidwalker
  • Affliction: Felhunter
  • Demonology: Felguard
  • Destruction: Imp
  • PvP: Succubus
  • AoE CD: Infernal
  • Single-target CD: Doomguard

I mean, that’s a pretty simple model, right? It’s something that is easy to understand and communicate to players. It provides a single niche for each demon, and a role for every one of them. It also provides each tree with an iconic demon, which appeals to the flavor of the class, the feeling of them.

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t like this model. I do like it. I like to think of the Felhunter as the Affliction demon, the Felguard as the Demonology demon, the Imp as the Destruction one. Back in 3.1. I was Affliction, but I ran with the Doomguard/Succubus in PvE because that DPS was so much better than the Felhunter, and it felt… weird.

For PvP, at least, I cannot say there should be ever a single pet for that niche. I ran with the VW in Wintergrasp because Seduction was always getting broken (too much damage flying around). I ran with the Felpup for ages in normal battlegrounds just to have the pre-nerf Devour Magic constantly eating magic effects off of me. I ran with the Succy as Destro in 10- and 15-man BGs, and only brought out the Imp when I wanted to raid.

Grouping all of PvP into a single activity is sloppy thinking.

While the idea one demon for each role is a nice one, it fails to take into account the complexities of each PvP situation, of appropriateness. Use the right tool for the right job. If you’re Affliction and you need extra CC, run the Succubus. If you need a tank and a bubble shield, run the VW. If you’re Demo and you need to lock down a caster, run with the Felpup instead of the Felguard.

For PvE, however, perhaps it makes sense as a design direction. Each spec could have its own demon, which is then buffed by talents within that tree.

The problem with this philosophy is that the choice of demon becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, regardless of the utility of each pet – you run with whatever gives you the highest DPS, no matter what, and the talents are in place to achieve that result, so that’s the one you use.

Regardless of talents, glyphs, or other modifiers, regardless of whether the baseline DPS is normalized across demons or not, if the DPS of demons varies, raiders will choose the one that offers the best DPS. PvP selection will remain based on utility (as long as DPS is relatively equal, remember, a lot of times demons are on Passive), but PvE will always, always, recommend one as the best DPS option for each spec. Why can I say that? Because that’s how optimization works. Its goal is simple: find the best option.

The problem that I see happening is that players become unhappy when the results of the DPS analysis don’t match their expectations of what the correct pet should be. Perhaps it’s the model up above, perhaps it’s a different one. But when the player’s expectations don’t match the actual modeled behavior, something fascinating happens – warlock players get emotional about their demons.

Consider a different way of talking about this whole discussion. We have 5 mutually exclusive stances we warlocks can choose from, each capable of inflicting a single damage over time effect on a single target. The damage of that DoT varies according to some interactions with your spec and glyphs, so they’re not equal in the end (though they’re roughly equal before modifications). Each stance also opens up several subordinate abilities, but they are generally not DPS-affecting. The stances are called: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon.

Let’s be honest. You don’t care which stance you adopt. You take the one that gives you the highest DPS as a default, and switch stances as necessary to make use of subordinate abilities. If all of the DoTs inflicted the same damage, you’ll take the one with the abilities you want, and switch as necessary.

If you remove all the skins, all the imagery, all the attachment and history to these demons, you’re left with this: DoTs that can move and grant extra abilities.

Blizzard deliberately doesn’t refer to pets and demons like this. From a game design standpoint, they are moving DoTs – but they know that appearance and identity of NPCs is important. Players are not playing a neutral mathematical game of cold logic, they are playing a game where they want to forget themselves for a while and kill internet dragons.

The conflict that we’re seeing now is not just about maximizing DPS, or balancing DPS and utility. No, this is something deeper.

This is about a dog, and a girl.

THE LOST PUPPY AND THE GIRL EVERYONE HATES

The Felhunter was the king of the PvP demons in Wrath of the Lich King. Devour Magic was both an offensive and defensive dispel, giving a Warlock incredible flexibility in combat. It was on a 6-second CD, so it wasn’t quite as good as a healer’s dispel, but it was an excellent ability. Your felpup would eat and eat and eat buffs off your target, and then you could turn around and eat that critical spell off yourself or your healer that prevented a devastating combo.

And he still had Spell Lock and great DPS on top of all this. Everyone hated the Felhunter in battlegrounds. He was a rage magnet and was sure to get killed, because people knew he was going to be huge amounts of trouble until he was dead.

God damn, I loved my felpup in Wrath.

The Succubus, on the other hand, was a bit weaker in Wrath. She lacked the knockback which makes her so much fun to run with now, and instead had a melee debuff – Soothing Kiss – which reduced melee attack speed by 10%, in addition to reducing threat. She was positioned as a DPS demon – good for leveling if you didn’t want the VW, good for running dungeons because she was low-threat and had additional CC to help on tricky pulls. She was fragile in PvP and died a lot. There were some talents you could take in the Demo tree which would make her Seduce effectively instant-cast, but really only Destro PvP warlocks used her, and even then, she was more useful in Arenas and small combat than larger battlegrounds.

Because you had to talent her to make her truly useful in PvP, using the Succubus was a deliberate choice you had to make while setting up your spec, so you saw a lot of Destro locks running with her – the Imp was useless in PvP – while Affliction warlocks swarmed to the Felhunter. That’s okay, people gravitate to what works well.

If one demon is clearly superior to the others for one spec in both PvP and PvE, it becomes identified with that spec. And that’s what happened – Demonology had the Felguard, Affliction had the Felpup.

Destruction, though… Destruction got to switch between the Imp and the Succy/Felhunter, with the Voidwalker tossed in once Sacrifice didn’t actually kill the demon. The Imp is strongly identified with Destro in most people’s minds, but that’s because it became the strongest PvE spec in 3.2, and Imps swarmed all over ToC and Ulduar.

And then came Cataclysm.

Cataclysm was not kind to the Felhunter. First, Devour Magic became solely an offensive dispel, and the defensive component was moved to the Imp. Good for the Imp! He could actually be brought into PvP and not run away in terror! But very bad for the Felpup.

Then, he lost the talents in the Affliction tree which made him desirable in the first place. Other trees gained DoTs, which meant he could fit in well as a general pet, but Affliction lost its special hold on him. And his glyph was changed from a DPS increase to a healing glyph.

As the last insult, the cooldown on the nerfed Devour Magic was more than doubled in the last patch. Holy fuck, way to neuter the poor guy!

So, in two patches, the Felhunter:

  1. Lost his defensive dispel
  2. Lost his Affliction talents
  3. Lost his glyph to increase damage
  4. Had his offensive dispel cut in half (due to increased CD)

(Oh yeah; the change to the Devour Magic CD halved the effectiveness of his glyph, too.)

During the same period of time, the Succubus got a makeover. She lost Soothing Kiss (which only die-hard PvPers actually used) and gained Whiplash, which is an awesome tool for PvP. No one expects the warlock to knock them off the lumber mill! Drop a circle near the edge, park the succy by the flag, and wait for the rogue to gank you. If you get knocked off, teleport back and do it to them instead. It is awesome.

And while she lost her specific talents in Demonology, she got a brand new glyph with a dramatic DPS increase, causing everyone to stand up and take a look at her again. This was a DPS demon, after all, with an extra CC to boot! Both her PvE and PvP viability took off.

But… she’s still not the best demon for Destruction warlocks to use, because the Imp got buffed, too. The people who likely worked with her during Wrath didn’t need her anymore, while warlocks who were quite comfortable with their Felhunters and Felguards suddenly were realizing that they could get better DPS if they switched to this … evil personification of sex.

And there lies the rub.

If we were talking about switching between Alpha and Epsilon, this wouldn’t be a problem. Epsilon this month, Gamma the next month, whatever, it’s all greek to me, just keep my DoTs rollin’.

But we’re talking about a beloved dog who’s fallen on hard times, whom people have genuine affection for, who symbolized a spec.

And we’re talking about that dog getting replaced by a hypersexualized stranger, a demon who is almost … embarrassing to watch. Yes, that’s the point, I know that. She is supposed to be over the top. She is supposed to be an evil personification of sex. That’s all well and good.

What I think people are reacting to is that the Succubus is the single most obnoxious combat pet in the entire World of Warcraft. Oh god, the noises! The grunting, the moaning, the constant ass-slapping and whip cracking! And it’s not just during raids, when our fellow players have to put up with it and it’s vaguely amusing for the first 30 minutes. No, it’s constant when you play a warlock. Hours of these antics. Days.

You know, even good porn gets boring after a few hours.

Don’t get me wrong; her character model is also irritating. It looks terrible set against the newer textures of the later expansions, which detracts mightily from even the idea that she’s supposed to be seductive. But then she opens her mouth, slaps her ass, the noises start again, and a low-polygon model is the least of my concerns.

I can pinpoint the moment I made peace with my Succubus – it’s when I found the “Turn Pet Sounds Off” setting.

This is the girl that everyone hates. Even those of us who love her hate her. She came in and kicked out both down-on-his-luck demon puppy and a big lug of a demon from their respective jobs. She’s loud, she’s brash, she’s obnoxious, she isn’t wearing much in the way of clothing, and she doesn’t care.

(Actually, when it’s put that way, she sounds like the perfect warlock minion.)

I honestly don’t know why the succubus is so hated. I really don’t. Yes, she’s obnoxious. Yes, she’s poorly drawn. I think it’s something deeper, a combination of both difficult mechanics to master  (seduce-nuking is not intuitive), awkward placement in the leveling process, and a sense that she’s not the right representation for a given spec.

Or, maybe she’s too aggressively sexual, and that just plain makes people uncomfortable.

I’d like to think that’s not it. I really do.

But ask yourself this; if Blizzard introduced a new demon – say a half-dragon, or one of those demon engineers from Outland, or, shit, I don’t know, a sparkly unicorn-Ragnaros hybrid with legs – and made it really good at both PvP and PvE, would we be having the same discussion?

Is this really about utility and DPS?

Or is it about a lost dog that people miss, and a girl that everyone hates?

The gender issues in this discussion are both really interesting and, to be honest, somewhat disturbing.

I’ll leave it at that.

CHOOSE YOUR DEMON WISELY

Do demons need to fill roles? That’s what this really comes down to, doesn’t it? Does it matter what role a specific demon fills? Why does it matter?

I started off Cataclysm firmly in a traditionalist camp; each spec should have a signature demon that has synergy with that tree’s abilities for endgame play, with the voidwalker being primarily useful for early leveling, and the succubus getting used for crowd control and PvP. It’s a nice, easy to learn model, one that makes sense to new players and could – perhaps – make this crazy class easier, and therefore more appealing, to play.

But now, I’m not so sure. I swap demons in and out of fights every night. I open with one, interrupt with another, finish with a third. I’m not tied to any one demon. Perhaps it’s the Soul Burn mechanic which has changed my playstyle, which in turn changed my perspective. Perhaps it’s just that I’m not doing a lot of PvE anymore, where your pets are more static. I don’t recall switching demons mid-fight in ICC, ever. But the mechanics were different, and it wasn’t practical. Now it is.

For PvP, choosing your demon is about utility and making your tools work for you. Yes, the Felhunter has been nerfed a lot, but the old dog has a lot of fight left in him, and he’s the demon I want when I need to take down a healer. If he works for you, use him. If the succy works for you, use her. Voidwalker? Use him, he’s actually decent in PvP now. Heck, even the Imp has utility!

If you don’t know which one is best for you, try them all. Look at each one of their special abilities and figure out how you can use it. Every ability has a use in PvP, you just have to find it.

(Yes, even Flee has a use.)

Experiment with macros to keybind these abilities. You can embed them in your normal spells, or create context-specific macros like the following:

/cast [pet: felhunter] Devour Magic; [pet: Succubus] Seduction; [pet: Voidwalker] Sacrifice; [pet:Imp,@player] Singe Magic; Curse of the Elements

Or for their alternate abilities,

/cast [pet: felhunter] Spell Lock; [pet: Succubus] Whiplash; [pet: Voidwalker] Consume Shadows; [pet: Imp] Flee; Curse of the Elements

… and see how they work. This isn’t rocket science. This is finding creative and clever ways to use abilities you might not know you had.

For PvE, I think a question remains – do you go with what gives the highest theoretical DPS, the most utility, or a compromise between the two positions? Should Blizzard redesign demons to make your choice a cosmetic one, one based upon the buffs and abilities the demons grant? Should they slot them into a defined role-based system, so that each spec runs with one demon and one demon only?

Or do they change things up periodically with each patch, making “which demon should I run with now?” a valid question? Is it interesting that the Succubus is top DPS demon for two specs? Is it different? Is it making players try things that they haven’t tried before?

Our class is constantly changing, for good and for ill.

I think it makes sense that our demons change with us.

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Warlock Macros in Cataclysm

I am a strong believer in using macros to help automate tasks.  They allow you to react quickly in game, switch targets, juggle multiple actions at once…

Yeah. I <3 macros.

If you have never used macros before, you may find my Introduction to Macros post helpful. If you’re just getting started with macros for your warlock, you may find my first post on Warlock Macros useful, though it is becoming rapidly out of date, as both the macro syntax and warlock class have changed.

Let’s get down to some new macros.

THE NEW HAWTNESS

Your Imp is now pretty damn good at PvP. It’s not just that he packs a wallop and can kill people on his own (because he can, daaaaamn) – no, it’s that he inherited the Felhunter’s friendly Dispel Magic.

If you run Destruction, you must have this macro:

/cast [@player] Singe Magic

and use it whenever possible. That Imp is going to burn the hostile magic off of you.  Affliction?

/cast [@mouseover] Devour Magic; [harm] Devour Magic

This will eat the buffs off of your mouseover target, or your target if your mouse isn’t pointing at something.

You know what else is pretty good? Fel Fire. You know why it’s good?

If you answered “green fire,” I will cut you. Yes, we know it’s green. Get past that.

No, it’s good because it’s an instant cast nuke with no cooldown. And that means you are, once again, a Shaman’s worst fucking nightmare.

To nuke those totems:

/cast [@mouseover,harm] Fel Flame; [harm] Fel Flame

Warlocks haven’t been able to use pet stomping totems for about a year, but with Fel Flame and a mouseover macro, we’re back in a big way. This macro will cast Fel Flame at your mouseover target (if you have one) or your target (if you don’t). When you see a totem forest, mouse over the totems and start spamming FF at them. If you don’t have a mouseover target, it will hit your target instead.

This type of macro is also really useful if you want to try using more mouseover targeting in general. You can put any spell in there and swap between your target and your mouseover target with impunity.

You know what else is kinda cool? Soul Swap and a focus macro.

/console Sound_EnableSFX 0
/focus [@mouseover]
/cast [@target] soul swap
/cast [@focus] soul swap
/script UIErrorsFrame:Clear()
/console Sound_EnableSFX 1
/clearfocus [@focus,dead]

Much like the Fear Focus macro (which you’re using, because you CC like a Pro, right?), this one:

  • Makes your mouseover your focus.
  • Sucks the DoTs off the target on the first press.
  • Shoots the DoTs onto the focus on the second press.
  • Clears your focus when the mob dies.

Awesome for handling adds on a boss, putting pressure on people in PvP, being popular at cocktail parties, whatever. Awesome.

Update 1/5/2011: There’s only one … itty bitty problem. Sometime in the past week, this macro became bugged, and now responds with the error message, “Spell Not Learned.” The answers I’ve seen on the forums is that you need to drop your current spec and respec to fix it, which is crazy, but there you have it. It *does* work, just… not right now. :-(

Moving on.

I tend to spam keys, which can be great for DPS but bad for channeled spells or targeting circles. Something about hitting a key repeatedly tells the UI “this person is a hyperactive moron who can’t make up his or her mind about Shadowfury…”

But I digress. Drain Life is definitely something you want to let tick through the whole way. So:

/cast [nochannelling] Drain Life

or, a slightly more complicated version (which I use):

/cast [mod] Drain Soul; [nochanneling] Drain Life

will prevent my spammy fingers from stopping DL before the healing ticks come through, and:

/cast !Shadowfury

keeps the circle from going in and out while I pound on the keyboard.

(I do not want to talk about the removal of Drain Mana.)

Improved Soul Fire is a totally hax buff, but keeping it up in PvP can be a pain. You’ll want to take advantage of burning a shard and making it instant cast, like so:

/castsequence reset=2,combat Soulburn, Soul Fire

If you’re Affliction, you can use this as well:

/castsequence reset=2,combat Soulburn, Seed of Corruption

Bang this key twice to empower your Soul Fire and Seeds, or just once if you want to do something else.

If you want to be extra special, add Curse of the Elements to the end. Since Soul Fire and Seed of Corruption has a travel time, you can sometimes get Curse of the Elements on before SF hits, giving you an additional 12% damage and lowering the target’s resistances. I usually don’t spam it, just tap it twice… but having the additional curse at the end is always nice if I’m on the run.

Speaking of being on the run, you need to be able to cast on the run, no matter what your spec. Make a macro solely for you instant cast spells so you can be dishing out the pain when on the move:

/castsequence reset=2,combat Corruption, Bane of Agony, Curse of the Elements, Immolate

I end with Immolate because I want something to let me know that I’m out of DoTs to cast without stopping. You can use Unstable Affliction or Fear here too, just give yourself something with a cast time so that you don’t cycle continuously through three DoTs and waste your mana.

At the same time, you should have a fairly standard setup for questing. This is less about doing the most DPS, and more about killing things in the most efficient manner possible.  For Destro I use:

/castsequence reset=2,combat Immolate, Conflagrate, Incinerate, Incinerate, Chaos Bolt, Fel Fire, Drain Life

This is pretty straightforward; just have a macro you can pound on that delivers the spells you need onto a mob as quickly as you can. I usually pop a Soul Fire before starting that one, but it’s not something I always have time to stand around for.

OLD STANDARDS

Here are some modified versions of macros I published in my first Warlock Macros post.

Buffs! Everyone likes them, and they’re a bit easier to manage now. I prefer a post-GY rez macro for when I’m coming back from the dead; I just hit it until all my buffs are back.

/castsequence reset=@player,2 Fel Armor, Soul Link, Unending Breath, Create Healthstone, Create Soulstone

Now that stones don’t cost shards, there’s zero reason not to buff yourself with them. Combine the above with:

/cast  Create Soulstone
/use [nocombat,help,nomodifier:alt] Soulstone; [nocombat,@player] Soulstone

which will apply a Soulstone to a player if one is targeted, or to yourself of not.

THE MISSING PARTS

I’m obviously missing some abilities here – I’m not playing Demonology right now, and it shows, as I’m not really up to speed on the Felguard’s abilities or Hand of Gul’dan. I’m also somewhat focused on PvP right now, so haven’t dived into a lot of PvE-specific macros yet.

So, I’d love to see what you’re using – post your macros below in the comments!

(Don’t forget to look at Wowwiki for more Warlock Macros, too.)

Enjoy!

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Filed under Cynwise's Battlefield Manual, Warlockery

Warlock CC and You: How to Crowd Control Like a Pro in Cataclysm

I love Fear.

Let’s get that out of the way right now. There are a lot of things about playing a warlock that I like, and near the top of my list is Fear. That spell is bound to the 4 button in every spec I play.

I am going to quote from the great “How To Battleground” thread by Dusk:

These people want to kill you. You are a warlock. They all hate you.

They are going to go out of their way to harm you as deeply and as earnestly as they can, and then they are going to /spit and /lol at your corpse, because everybody hates warlocks.

They hate fear, they despise dots, your felhunter is a rage magnet and deathcoil once made the entire wow population cry floods of bitter tears for over a year.

You want to know why I quote from that thread so much? Not because it’s about Warlock PvP – though it is – but because it’s about what it is to be a great Warlock, a complete Warlock, a master of this crazy class.

And in PvP, that means you are a master of Fear. You rip control of other characters away from their characters, and then you kill them. And they can’t do anything about it.

But in PvE, Fear didn’t have the best reputation. It tended to send mobs scurrying hither and yon, sending them screaming into packs of their friends that the tank wasn’t quite ready to pull just yet.

That changed dramatically in Cataclysm.

CROWD CONTROL IS A REQUIREMENT IN CATACLYSM

I have been told that the new dungeons of Cataclysm are hard. That they are punishing. That they are not facerolls, where you can press your AoE spell of choice and go check Twitter!

I have also been told that there are damage dealers out there who have forgotten that when the going gets tough on the tank and healers, their job is to make it easier on those tanks and healers! That these people, playing DPS classes, are refusing to use crowd control! That they don’t even know what that is!

I have even been told that there are WARLOCKS out there who are refusing to use crowd control!

This cannot stand. Do you hear me? THE LINE MUST BE DRAWN HERE.

THIS FAR! NO FURTHER.

You bring shame upon this great class if you refuse to CC.

If you are a warlock, you have the best PvP CC in the game. Do you hear me? IN THE ENTIRE GAME. You have the biggest damn CC toolbox of any class. You have Fear, which when glyphed freezes the mob in place instead of running to bring their friends. You have Banish and are fighting an invasion of Elementals. You have slows, and stuns, and an instant terror that damages your opponent while healing you.

You have no excuses left, Warlocks. You are going to CC like a fucking pro, because Fearing things while killing them is what you do.

DO ONE THING WELL, NOT TWO THINGS POORLY

You want to know why CC looks hard in PvE? It’s not because people can’t open up their spellbook and drag Fear to their damn action bar. No, it’s because it involves multitasking. Instead of tracking one target, you have to track two. You have to watch your normal rotation as well as make sure CC doesn’t fall off.

The key is to not treat them as two targets.

Wait, what?

You heard me.

Don’t multitask – integrate your CC with your normal priority rotation instead. Monitor the CC just as you would any other DoT or CD. Do it in the same place on the screen, in the same mental space.

To do this you’ll need two things – a decent macro and a decent debuff tracker. Let’s start with the macro.

CC FOCUS MACRO

The Warcraft UI has a handy feature in it that allows you to track two targets at once – a Focus. Focus are an advanced kind of Target and is only available via macros and slash commands. Your Focus persists until you change it and is independent of your active Target.

If that’s confusing, think of it this way.

  • Your Target is set by tabbing or clicking on things. It shows up next to your character portrait.
  • Your Focus is set by macros, doesn’t care what you click on, and is separate from your Target. It shows up near the middle of the screen.

So what we’re going to do is use a macro to set your CC target as your Focus, while the thing you’re supposed to kill remains your Target.

Let’s take a look at a Fear Focus macro.

#showtooltip
/focus [target=focus, noexists][target=focus, dead] mouseover
/cast [target=focus, exists] Fear; Fear
/stopmacro [nomodifier]
/clearfocus [modifier:ctrl]

This macro is straight off of WowWiki. It’s simple and does the job. (If you haven’t used macros before, here’s a brief tutorial.) Make one for Fear and one for Banish.

Here’s what it does when you press the button.

  • Sets your mouseover target – whatever your mouse is pointing at – to be your Focus, if you don’t have one. Then it casts Fear at it.
  • If you aren’t pointing your mouse at anything, it will cast Fear at your normal target.
  • If you press Ctrl while clicking the button it will clear your Focus.
  • It also clears your Focus when your Focus dies.

Here’s how you use it.

You’re in a dungeon, and the tank has marked the mobs Skull, X, and Moon.

  • You target Skull.
  • Put your mouse over Moon.
  • Press your CC button. Moon will become your Focus. You’ll cast Fear at it.
  • Cast your normal DPS spells against Skull.
  • When Fear is about to fade from Moon, refresh it by pressing the CC button again. Do not retarget.  CC will go to Moon, everything else goes to Skull.
  • When it is time to kill Moon, just shift your target to it. Don’t bother with your CC button or clearing the Focus.

The reason to use a Focus macro is so that you do not have to shift your targets back and forth. Your CC goes to one mob, everything else goes to the other mob.

If you’re having trouble understanding this, go to the nearest set of target dummies and try this macro out on two separate targets.

NEVER DROP A BEAT

The Focus macro is only the first part of becoming an awesome Crowd Controller. The next step is making sure that your CC is always up, and that the mob you’re assigned to tank stays tanked. That mob is going nowhere while you are on duty. If it gets hit by an AoE attack, or someone tab-targets a DoT on to them, it does not matter.

They are going to stay put until you are damn well ready to kill them!

Remember that crazy thing I said about not multitasking? Well, the one thing you don’t want to do is have to track DoTs on two different mobs in two different places on your screen. Don’t focus solely on your target, because then you won’t see that your CC victim got hit with an AoE attack and is running loose. Don’t focus solely on your CC, or your DPS will suffer.

No, what you need is to unify your interface. Track your Focus CC alongside all of your other important DoTs and CD tracking.

I recommend the addon Need To Know for this.

I’ve covered my personal setup of Need To Know in more detail elsewhere, but the basic idea is to take only those the buffs, debuffs, and cooldowns you need to track and put them all into one central location, like so:

Here I’ve called out the essential things I need to track as a Destruction Warlock for DPS – Improved Soul Fire buff, Immolate duration on my target, Conflagrate CD – but I’ve added in a line for my CC, above my cast bar space.

But it’s important to note something – NTK isn’t monitoring CC on my target, it’s monitoring CC on my Focus. Once I start CCing that mob with the macro above, all I have to do is make sure that that bar stays up. If it breaks, the bar disappears and I recast. If it’s about to run out, I hit my CC button and recast Fear or Banish.

I don’t have to multitask to keep a mob under control. And neither do you. It is awesome when you don’t have to split your attention – just watch the NTK bars.

You set up your CC bar like other NTK bars, but with one key difference:

Instead of monitoring your Target, you monitor your Focus instead.

Also, since you will probably need to switch between Fear and Banish on different mobs, you can make NTK look for both in the same bar. I put all my CC into a single line – just separate them with commas.

These two things in combination make CC a breeze in dungeons. Do them, and Crowd Control becomes trivial. You will make it look easy, which is as it should be.

You’re a Warlock. You are the best damn CC class in the game.

WARLOCK TIPS AND TRICKS

The Glyph of Fear is what makes this all work, of course. It’s one thing to have a great CC toolkit for PvP, but the biggest problem with Fear before Cataclysm was how it sent mobs running all over tarnation, where they’d pull packs of their friends and make you less than popular among your PvE group. But you’re not limited to Fear.

Choose the right tool for the job. Fear is your default, but Banish is useful against Demons and Elementals. There are subtle differences between the two – Fear breaks on damage, Banish does not, but Banish is harder to chain – but they also give you the option of CCing two mobs at once (though you shouldn’t try DPSing the third.) Your Succubus’s Seduction ability is yet another CC option against Humanoid opponents, if you already have her out for her knockback.

You are the tank for your target and responsible for positioning; move them as necessary. You are not helpless in the face of AoE damage to your CC target. Many melee DPS classes rely upon area of effect spells as part of an effective rotation, and they sometimes errantly hit the CC target. Or, the tank might start AoE tanking and nick your mob – perhaps they didn’t pull the main pack far enough away, or things just aren’t going right. If this happens, you are not helpless.

  • Death Coil will break Fear and send the mob fleeing for a short burst of time, letting you reposition them away from the main fight. Reapply Fear when you get them where you want.
  • Searing Pain can be used to break Fear and draw the mob towards you. Position yourself in the direction you need the mob to go and use Demonic Circle to get out of harm’s way while you reapply CC.
  • Your Succubus has a knockback effect – Whiplash – and you can get your controlled mob out of the way of AoE with it. Blow a shard, summon the Succy instantly, then move the mob.
  • If your mob is Banished, casting Banish will break the banishment and move them towards you again. You can apply DoTs to make sure you have the mob’s attention, then reposition them as they come after you.

Howl of Terror and Death Coil are in case of emergency. These two spells are both very powerful when used correctly. If the tank totally loses aggro on a pack of mobs and they are all going towards the healer, Howl at them. Tanks don’t like gathering up fleeing mobs, but at least they’re not eating the healer. Death Coil is a similar tool; it can be used to peel a mob off a healer, but you aren’t in control with it. Use it as a way to seize control, since it’s an instant cast on a CD.

I personally also recommend that you glyph Shadowflame, as that will give you an awesome slow for PvP and PvE alike. It is a huge, huge slow – 70%! – but not everyone will want to spare the glyph slot. Consider it, at least.

THROWING DOWN THE GAUNTLET

I know that I can be… uh… enthusiastic? about Warlocks. But if you’re another DPS class with CC, you can absolutely take this approach and use it to become awesome Crowd Controllers, too.

Mages, if you can’t see that this works perfectly with Polymorph, I don’t know what to tell you. It’s bad enough you have Frost Nova, but there is no reason you can’t be sheeping and pigging and lord knows what else to mobs! Seriously, you have a rep to protect here! Are you going to let Warlocks show you up? Again?

(Also, buy my Tomes of Polymorph: Turtle off the AH. I have alts to support.)

And all the rest of you! Every DPS class with CC, no matter how good or how poor, can use focus macros and a good debuff tracker to ensure that they are controlling their assigned mob. Rogues have Sap. Ele Shammies have Hex. Druids have Hibernate and Entangling Roots. Hunters can trap and kite like no one’s business.

Every DPS needs to look at their bag of tricks and figure out what they can do. If you can’t CC, you can interrupt. Everyone has something. If you aren’t CCing, you should be on Interrupt duty. Period. End of story.

But this is what Cataclysm PvE is like; DPS needs to look at CC as something they have to do, and take pride in doing well.

And to my fellow Warlocks: I expect you to be among the best in the game. Show those Mages what we’ve got.

When everyone competes to be the best CCers, we ALL win.

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Filed under Cynwise's Battlefield Manual, Warlockery