Class Distribution Data for Patch 5.4.2

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - General Population Graph

 

 

Oh. Hey, how’s it going? Enjoying the end of Mists of Pandaria? Leveling a lot of alts, are we?

While Patch 5.4.2 wasn’t a major content patch, it marks a good point to take a look at the middle of this long end-of-expansion period and see how classes are doing in World of Warcraft. This data follows the same methodology of my previous census posts (previously, previously, previously, previously) in that it is snapshotting census data from  Realmpop and World of Wargraphs,  then analyzing that data over time.

All data is available in my Warcraft Class Distribution – Mists of Pandaria 5.4.2 Google spreadsheet. Previous versions are linked in the previous census posts.

This snapshot was collected on 1/8/14 and 1/13/13. I’m going to call it Patch 5.4.2 data even though the patch dropped on December 10th, 2013. (I got busy during the holidays, sorry.)

Go ahead and open up the spreadsheet in another window, and let’s get started.

OVERALL POPULATION TRENDS

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - General Population Chart

 

The expected flow of an expansion is that players will level their main characters to endgame first, with alt characters following later on as time permits. The final content patch of an expansion allows many players to focus their attention on other characters after completing the final raid, resulting in people leveling alts. My theory is that we should see a more even distribution of classes as the expansion ages and players level those alts.

In general, I think we’re starting to see that. The 6 point disparity between Paladins/Druids and Rogues/Monks from the beginning of the expansion has lessened. Monks and Rogues have both gained a point, Paladins and Druids have lost a point, but everyone is starting coalesce around the 9.19% mean.

The one exception to this rule is Hunters; the Hunter class continues to steadily hold at 11.5%. My guess is that the Hunter class continues to be friendly to new players, Hunter mains, and folks leveling alts, so we aren’t seeing any drop off there. 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - Percent of Total At Endgame

 

The chart above is the percentage of a class which has leveled to level 90, which gives us an insight into the overall health of a class through the leveling process as well as who people picked for their initial mains in Mists of Pandaria. Hybrids tend to level to 90 more frequently than Pure DPS classes, so we can evaluate them in two groups.

Hybrids (tanks, healers, DPS) tend to all be around 27-28.5%. Hybrids who can perform all three roles (Druids, Monks, Paladins) aren’t really that different from those who can perform only two roles (Death Knights, Priests, Shamans, Warlocks) in this respect, with one exception: Warriors. Warriors continue to be the least leveled-to-endgame hybrid class, and are the second least popular overall. Considering the class which overlaps them the most (Death Knights) is the second highest on this chart, that continues to be alarming.

Pure DPS tend to all be around 26%, with one exception: Rogues. Rogues are still the least leveled-to-endgame class, continuing the trends we saw in 5.4. There’s been the same slow improvement as before but it really seems to be a niche class for both mains and alts.

We’re now seeing a consistent trend throughout Mists – players are not choosing to play Warriors and Rogues at the endgame. If you look at the overall population figures you can see that Rogues are much more represented in the 10-85 pool – 8.85% – but then they fall off dramatically in the 86-90 range and never recover. Interestingly, Warriors do not have this drop in population – instead, they’re just an unpopular hybrid at all levels (compared to other hybrids). 

Without substantial changes to the class play style or a substantial carrot offered to players of these two classes, I don’t see any real substantial changes for Rogues or Warriors until the next expansion, Warlords of Draenor

DOING THE HARD STUFF

Class representation in Heroic PvE (6+ bosses) and Rated PvP (1800+ rating) is always a tricky thing. It’s all well and good to look at the classes to see what people are using when Doing the Hard Stuff, but the presence or absence of a class is not in and of itself a sign of a problem. Raid mechanics might favor one spec over another, PvP burst might favor one class over another, etc.. We have seen times when representation in hard mode Warcraft was absolutely fine, DPS was fine, and yet the class was seriously struggling (Warlocks in Cataclysm) – and we’ve also seen times when certain specs have been vastly underrepresented, yet people do amazing things with them. (Demonology Warlocks were abysmally represented in Rated PvP at the same time a Demolock won the World Arena title.)

So use this data cautiously. Think before you jump to any conclusions with it.

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - Class Representation in Hard Stuff

 

Here’s the total population vs endgame vs PVE vs PVP chart. The general idea behind this one is to point out areas where a class might be over or underrepresented in an area of the game relative to its overall endgame population. Paladins, for instance, are 11.1% of the endgame population and 11.7% of the heroic raiding population – relatively balanced. Priests, on the other hand, are 9.5% of the endgame population but 11.8% of heroic raiding and 12.8% of the ranked PvP data set. They are performing very well at the hard stuff.

General observations:

  • Death Knights, Hunters, and Warriors are less represented than their general endgame population. For DKs and Hunters my guess is that they are excellent classes for casual players as well as experts, so they are overrepresented in the endgame pop and underrepresented in heroics. Warriors are a different matter. Mages struggle a little bit in heroics. Rogues struggle in PvP.
  • Shaman and Druids seem to be doing very well in heroics. Warlocks seem to have a bit of an edge with mechanics in the current raid tier and have solid representation as well. Warriors and Priests are doing amazingly well in PvP.

The details for each class can be found on the PvE and PvP tabs. 

Digging into the specs (PvE, PvP) shows us some interesting tidbits, like Arms and Holy are doing great in PvP, Destruction Warlocks are dominating in SoO (due to raid mechanics, I assume?). But we also have a complete enough data set that we can start plotting Spec Popularity over Time, at least for heroics and rated PvP. 

POPULARITY OVER TIME

You snapshot data enough times and finally you can do some visualizations with it. I’ve divided the spec data from World of Wargraphs into 4 sections for each Hard Mode activity (PvE, PvP) and graphed them according to role and function within that activity. In theory, people familiar with each class should be able to pinpoint certain changes that were made either to the class or to the content that swung the herd into favoring certain classes over each other. 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvE Healer Specs

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvE Tank Specs

 

 

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvE Melee Specs

 

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvE Ranged Specs

 

As I look over these graphs, I can’t help but wonder about things like raids which favor absorb healers vs throughput healers, tiers which favor more tanks versus fewer tanks, encounters which reward cleave specs versus multi dot or single target specs. 

PvP is a different set of stories, presented in a similar fashion.

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvP Healer Specs

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvP Tank Specs

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvP Melee Specs

 

Warcraft Census 5.4.2 - PvP Ranged Specs

 

It’s amazing, looking at these graphs, to see the effects of certain changes in gameplay. Fix the bug in Spirit Shell, change how Vengeance works in PvP, and watch players switch in high end play. Arms is a roller coaster that is currently going off the tracks in PvP.  The BM/MM flip is startling to see. All of these changes are likely tied into changes in each patch. It’ll be neat to see if folks can correlate the data with the changes.

CAVEATS AND CONCLUSION

A final few caveats.

First, there appears to be a lot more spec data in here than in previous census posts, though really it’s the same data presented over time. I don’t think a popular class being popular in a hard activity is really all that unusual. A small class like Monks or Rogues are going to be a smaller piece of the hard mode pie. It’s when an unpopular spec is popular at an activity – or vice versa – that I think it’s worth standing up and taking notice. Take a look at the spreadsheet and see where there’s huge deltas between the general endgame population and a given activity – that’s where there’s something going on, something good or bad.

Second, take these numbers with a grain of salt. They represent the movement of the masses, and while they might help shed light in to why people are playing – or not playing – a class, they’re not a determiner of your own personal performance or enjoyment. If you’re not chasing heroic mode achievements or 2200+ ratings, the spec data shouldn’t make you feel bad about your choices. 

But there’s a flip side, as I found out in Cataclysm – sometimes it’s reassuring to know when you’re struggling with a class that it’s not just you. If you’re not feeling your Warrior right now, or are suddenly really digging your Shaman – well, other people are too. Really like your Priest? There’s a reason for it. You’re not alone, there are reasons why people are making these kinds of decisions en masse

I’ll leave it up to you to level those alts and figure out which ones you enjoy the most.

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7 Comments

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7 responses to “Class Distribution Data for Patch 5.4.2

  1. I wonder if the Holy Paladin representation taking a nosedive and Resto Shaman getting a huge bump is related to the amount of AoE healing this tier. By my understanding, Holy Paladins have been struggling a little as of late with AoE, and then you have Resto Shaman who were already pretty good at AoE healing (but miserable at everything else) get buffed through the wazoo. But similar to DS, there is a lot of stacking healing in this tier (though not quite to the same % it was then), which really plays to Shaman strength. Or I could be totally crazy.

  2. Although I never do Rated BGs, that fits with my informal observation in regular BGs. Warriors became the new hotness, and a lot of BM Hunters seem to have switched into Marksmanship. Frost Mages benefited from some adjustments mid-expac, and I think that carried over into PvP. Disco Priests are still prevalent in BGs, but Holy has been sighted more often.

    My rule of thumb is that the easiest way you can tell if you’re going to lose a BG is if you’ve got 3+ Rogues in a 10-man BG or 4-5+ Rogues in a 15-man BG. That’s too much of a damper on DPS to overcome, particularly in a random.

    Thanks for the data as always.

  3. Cain

    I always love these posts. I’ve got one of every class now at 90, and there are definitely some that just felt painful to level and others that I really enjoyed the leveling. In the heroic pve I wonder how much of the classes with two dps specs fluctuation is all because of what sim’d higher, and not actually based on what the player felt while playing it. I definitely remember that happening when I did heroic raiding still. “Why aren’t you playing this spec, it sim’s just barely higher than the one you are playing”

  4. Thank you for putting this together, fascinating data. I have my own theory about hunters. Same one I had 8 years ago :)

    Hunters are an amazingly fun class to play. They have a “fun” meta game (collecting pets, mastering traps, etc) and like you said, they remain easy to learn and relatively easy to be good at (it used to be difficult to be a bad hunter, and most bad hunters were called that becuase they couldnt do traps or similar ancillary combat tasks).

    I’m surprised but also not surprised that the Monk wasn’t as big a hit as the Death Knight.

  5. Pingback: Multi-classing and Player Choice | XP Chronicles

  6. Taeja

    As all tank representation is on a downward trend this suggests less 10 man guilds are reaching latter heroic bosses compared to 25 man.

    Some people may say this indicates 10 man is harder, but could this be early effects of the announced 1 size Mythic difficulty?